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Inside Out

ages 6+ | 100 % Say It's Worth Your Time

The five emotions inside a girl's head vie for control after a life-changing event.


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Rated PG PG for some thematic elements and mild rude humor.

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  • (Male)

    ages 5+ | Worth Your Time

    No sex, nudity, drug use, blood; a few jokes about cursing and a baby's toosh are about strong as it gets as Pixar does it again in another movie great for the whole family.

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  • (Male)

    ages 3+ | Worth Your Time

    It's interesting to me that there is no villain in this movie. I think it is an excellent, well-executed flick that is great for all audiences. Also helpful for young children to understand how to deal with their emotions.

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  • (Male) Michael Medved Show

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    This movie is inventive, it's funny, it's occasionally deeply touching, but the concept of joy, fear, anger, disgust and sadness competing to control a young girl's emotions, becomes incredibly complicated when joy and sadness go together on an epic journey through memory banks, a train of thought and islands representing family fun and honesty.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • (Female)

    ages 3+ | Worth Your Time

    Grade: A In a Nutshell: This is Pixar at its finest. It’s fresh and original and surprisingly deep. It’s about emotions, so expect to bring tissues. With a fantastic cast and great writing, this insightful animation will touch the hearts of all ages. It’s honest and imaginative and will make you think about your own life and memories in a new way. Uplifting Theme: · Amy Poehler’s character asks in the very beginning of the movie: “Do you ever look at someone and wonder what is going on inside their head?” The film is extremely creative in showing how our emotions work, as well as evolve. · “You can’t focus on what’s going wrong. There’s always a way to turn it around, to find the fun.” – Joy · I think everyone can relate to the feeling of sadness and melancholy we feel when remembering the past. Feeling sadness is OK. It’s a part of life and learning. Things I liked: · It’s a mature kid’s film. In other words, there aren’t stupid farting and burping scenes, like in most kid movies. · The color is lush and rich and meaningful. · Keep watching when the credits start rolling at the end of the movie. I love it when movies give you more. · “Train of thought”….ha ha - The funny voice talents include: Amy Poehler (Joy), Bill Hader (Fear), Lewis Black (Anger), Mindy Kaler (Disgust), Phyllis Smith (Sadness), and Richard Kind (Bing Bong). · I love how Joy gives herself pep talks and focuses on the good to keep herself happy. Shouldn’t we all do that more often? She says, “Joy, you’ll be in charge of the console, keeping Riley happy all day. And may I add I love your dress? It’s adorable. Oh, this old thing? Thank you so much! I love the way it twirls!” A few years ago I wrote a “Things that make me happy” list that I refer to when I’m feeling down. I’ve been trying to fill each day of my life with more of the things on that list. It sounds like such an “Oprah” thing to do, but it works and I highly recommend it! · There are several poignant moments when someone is feeling down and Sadness reflects the emotion, while carefully listening. Joy is surprised and learns that Sadness’ response is more helpful and appropriate than simply trying to cheer someone up or change the other person’s attitude. I’ll never forget when a dear friend’s husband died. Everyone was at a loss as to what to say. Most of us weakly grinned and said something like “I'm so sorry. Everything will be OK.” I watched as someone wrapped her arms around my friend's sorrowing body and simply cried with her. She later told me that meant more to her than anything else. · I loved the teenage boy’s reaction towards the end of the movie at the hockey game. · I remember being 11. It seemed like it lasted 2 years. · I get tired of being slapped and preached at by so many movies nowadays, but this film does none of that. It’s an intelligent movie that allows you to reflect and dig as deep as you would like. · Director Pete Docter successfully manages to make you feel happy and sad at the same time, like he did in Pixar’s brilliant movie “Up”. Things I didn’t like: · Some parts of Joy’s journey seemed super random and willy-nilly. Then again, some parts of my own journey are that way too. Funny lines: · “I read somewhere that an empty room is an opportunity.” - Joy “Where did you read that?” - Anger “It doesn’t matter. I read it and it’s great.” – Joy · “Congratulations, San Francisco. You’ve ruined pizza! First, the Hawaiians and now you!” – Anger · “Crying helps me slow down and obsess over the weight of life’s problems.” – Sadness · “When I’m through, Riley will look so good, the other kids will look at their own outfits and barf.” - Disgust · “Being cool is so exhausting.” – Emo teenager · “Wait Joy! You’ll get lost in there.” – Sadness “Think positive!” – Joy “Okay…I’m positive that you’ll get lost in there.” - Sadness · “Maybe it was a bear?” – Fear “There are no bears in San Francisco.” - Disgust “I saw a really hairy guy. He looked like a bear.” - Anger Tips for Parents: · Watching this film together creates a great opportunity to talk to your kids about life’s experiences and how they’re feeling. As a society, we’re often told to just have a good attitude and everything will work out. Well, sometimes things don’t work out. Kids need to know that their feelings are valid; they’re allowed to feel angry or disappointed or scared. It’s acting on our feelings that can often get us in trouble. · The movie is clean and inoffensive. · There is a scary clown scene that might worry wee ones (I just got back from Scotland and so I have to use the word “wee”). · Pixar has always been mindful of parents who are paying for the movie tickets and sitting through the film with their kids. As a mom, I definitely appreciate that. This movie is different in that parents may actually enjoy this movie more than their kids will, because of the profound truths layered underneath the color and fun.

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  • KSL Critic

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    Finally, a lucid, clever, fanciful explanation as to the inner workings of the human brain! And who is responsible for this rare breakthrough that turns the field of neuroscience "Inside Out"? It's Pixar, of course. The creative wizards of Pixar take us inside the mind of sweet, little newborn Riley, where we’re introduced to the five prime emotional motivators who push the buttons and pull the levers of the developing brain. The creativity and originality of this film are wonderful.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • Dove Foundation

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    “Inside Out” will have viewers leaving the theater happy! Pixar Studios has done it again—the story, humor, and imagination combine in a wonderful package that will delight audiences everywhere.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • (Female)

    ages 6+ | Worth Your Time

    Best Pixar movie to date! Take the emotion of 'UP' and the imagination of 'Toy Story' and you get this spectacular movie.

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  • (Male) Deseret News Critic

    No Maturity Rating |

    If you’ve taken any interest in Pixar’s latest summer offering, “Inside Out,” you may have raised an eyebrow at the virtual Care Bear stare critics have been beaming at the project.

    “Inside Out” is being called challenging, brilliant, original, heartfelt, hilarious and any other number of critic-clichéd adjectives you’d expect to hear about a movie sitting at 99 percent on rottentomatoes.com. But sometimes when critics, myself included, get behind a movie with this much enthusiasm, it ends up being an alienating message piece never intended for general audiences.

    Luckily for everyone, “Inside Out” isn’t that movie. “Inside Out” is that rare, oh, so very rare, marriage of accessibility and unconventionality. You as a movie lover will be free either to sit back and enjoy a beautifully honest family experience or hyperanalyze how difficult it must’ve been for director Pete Docter to fold wildly different realities into a single, worthwhile adventure.

    No matter which path you let your brain take, “Inside Out” has a lot to offer. Let’s go ahead and chat about a few highlights.

    The overview

    In case this is the first time you’re hearing about the film, let’s get the high-level overview out of the way.

    In “Inside Out,” we follow the story of Joy (Amy Poehler), the primary emotion and personality captain of a young, energetic girl named Riley (Kaitlyn Dias). When Riley’s family makes a move to the big city, Joy takes it upon herself to help Riley find the bright side of her new and sometimes scary surroundings. However, when Joy gets sucked away with her least favorite emotion, Sadness (Phyllis Smith), it’s up to Anger (Lewis Black), Fear (Bill Hader) and Disgust (Mindy Kaling) to guide Riley to a healthy outlook on this new chapter of her life.

    The characters

    Who knew you could become so emotionally attached to emotions?

    The driving relationship taking place in “Inside Out” centers on Riley and her bubbly inner optimist Joy. While Riley goes through her daily routines having no idea Joy exists, Joy devotes her every energy to Riley’s happiness.

    True, when put that way, it sounds a bit unhealthy. But within the rules defined in the “Inside Out” universe, Joy and Riley’s story is the sweetest thing coming out of the summer of 2015.

    But “Inside Out” doesn’t rest entirely on a single union. Audiences will enjoy “Inside Out” because of the moments between a father and his daughter or between confused parents, or the times Riley’s emotions try to find a safe place for their favorite person in the world. “Inside Out” is a movie that gets how important characters are, even when there’s already a compelling concept to hang your hat on.

    The emotions

    In this section, we’re no longer talking about the characters who happen to be emotions. We’re talking about your emotions and how you’re going to get to know every one of them while enjoying this 94-minute tale.

    Fear, Sadness, Joy, Anger and even Disgust will get their moments to shine inside your head while you’re watching “Inside Out” this weekend, and how cool is that? As you see them on the screen and then feel them at the same time, you can say, “I totally know her in real life.”

    The design

    I had the chance to chat with Pete Docter and Jonas Rivera a few months back, and when I commented on the realism involved in the film, Docter pointed out that this is actually one of the most cartoony movies in the Pixar library.

    When you take another look at the characters, it's clear Docter is spot-on with his assessment. There is kind of a celebration here of the simplistic yet overly exaggerated features of a Saturday morning cartoon. The world inside Riley’s head is colorful and compartmentalized into challenges, and the library of core memories looks like a giant, glowing bowl of Trix cereal.

    “Inside Out” will probably go down in history as Pixar’s most sophisticated and conceptual offering, but that doesn’t come at the high price of the innocence or fun our children or inner children have come to expect from animated offerings.

    Conclusion

    The winner of this year’s best animated picture has already been decided. Oh, sure, we’d like to see “Minions,” “The Peanuts Movie” and even Pixar’s next original piece, “The Good Dinosaur,” but let’s not be coy — “Inside Out” is something special. Movie audiences know when all the cards have fallen into place, and that’s exactly what’s happened with this delightfully complicated, simple little masterpiece.

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  • (Female)

    ages 6+ | Worth Your Time

    This Pixar installment has been compared to Up, which is spot on because it'll make you both laugh out loud and cry. It's such a clever concept - making one's emotions into characters. The animation of course is brilliant! It's amazing to see how lifelike their human characters are now. Kids will love the colors and the emotions; parents will appreciate the insight and humor. A lot will go over the target audience's heads, but there's nothing you have to worry about them catching on to (except maybe that broccoli is gross). i'd be willing to take my 2 year old. Best film I've seen in a while!

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  • (Female) Movie Mom

    ages 5+ | Worth Your Time

    Roger Ebert liked to refer to movies as an “empathy machine.” He said that the great gift of movies, more than any other art form, is the way they can put us inside the world, experiences, culture, and perspective of someone completely outside our own experience. But the best movies do that in a way that helps us understand ourselves as well. “Inside Out” is a rare film that takes us inside the mind of one very particular 11-year-old girl in a way that illuminates the vast breadth of human experience, with deep insights about our own particular quirks, struggles, and emotions. It is exciting, hilarious (two of the funniest jokes you will see on screen this year), and deeply profound, making the most complex concepts accessible in so that children and adults will learn more about who they are and how they got that way.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • (Male) Catholic News Service

    ages 8+ | Worth Your Time

    While the tiniest film fans might be put off by the peril in which its characters occasionally find themselves, the splendid comedy "Inside Out" (Disney) offers all others outstanding entertainment founded on strong values.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • ParentPreviews.com

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    the essence of the story is to appreciate all of our emotions. Admittedly Fear, Disgust and Anger don’t come across quite as favorable as the other two do. Still, Sadness earns her keep in this script, showing that life is full of a mixture of sentiments. That message will likely go over the heads of little ones who will be more entertained by the colorful animation and slapstick antics. Yet for older children and tweens, Inside Out can be a good way to begin a conversation about the importance of giving voice to all of our feelings.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • (Male) Plugged In

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    I can't claim that Inside Out is the best yet—not with the bar already so high. But I do think it's Pixar's most ambitious movie, and that's saying something. Getting into the mind of an 11-year-old girl is a daunting task, and director Pete Docter (who also directed Up and Monsters, Inc.) actually went so far as bringing in psychologists to help with the particulars. He and his moviemaking team also fleshed out a message that feels truly countercultural: Happiness isn't everything.

    Click here to read the full review

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  • (Male) Crosswalk

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    Don't let the animation fool you; this isn't really a movie for wee ones. The concepts are too sophisticated for the toddler crowd to appreciate. The three-year-old with us was restless the whole time; as cute as they are, Riley's emotions failed to engage her interest (a scary clown scene didn't help). Grade-schoolers should be fine; the pre-teen in our group loved it.

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  • (Male) Deseret News Critic

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    It’s a pretty creative way of illustrating the dramatic life-or-death way things like moving feel when you’re a kid (or an adult, really). Some of the complexity will probably be lost on younger viewers — at one point the characters learn that when Sadness touches a happy memory, Riley begins to see it in a melancholy light — but the story itself is entertaining enough to keep the kids’ attention. Still, adults might be the best audience to fully appreciate “Inside Out.” Pixar movies have always maintained a delicate balance between their young primary audiences and the adults paying for the movie tickets. In this case, the scales might be tipped more to Mom and Dad than ever.

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Okfor ages12+