Minority Report Minority Report

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Minority Report

ages 15+ | 75 % Say It's Worth Your Time

Minority Report is a 2002 American neo-noir science fiction film directed by Steven Spielberg and loosely based on the short story "The Minority Report" by Philip K. Dick. It is set primarily in Washington, D.C. and Northern Virginia in the year 2054, where "PreCrime", a specialized police department, apprehends criminals based on foreknowledge provided by three psychics called "precogs". The cast includes Tom Cruise as PreCrime officer John Anderton, Colin Farrell as Department of Justice agent Danny Witwer, Samantha Morton as the senior precog Agatha, and Max von Sydow as Anderton's superior Lamar Burgess. The film is a combination of whodunit, thriller, and science fiction. Spielberg has characterized the story as "fifty percent character and fifty percent very complicated storytelling with layers and layers of murder mystery and plot." The film's central theme is the question of free will vs. determinism. It examines whether free will can exist if the future is set and known in advance. Other themes include the role of preventative government in protecting its citizenry, the role of media in a future state where electronic advancements make its presence nearly boundless, the


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Genre: Thriller

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Ok for ages 15+ . What would you rate it? ?

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Rated PG-13

  • 5 of 10 Sex & Nudity
  • 6 of 10 Violence & Gore
  • 5 of 10 Profanity

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 75%
say worth your time 4 Votes

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  • ages 15+ | Not Worth Your Time

    Although I liked the concept, this movie was disturbing in multiple ways. With an F-word, a man catching his wife in bed with another man (and the husband is there to kill them), and the guy who wants to experience what it's like to have sex as a woman---I think this movie deserves an R-rating.

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  • (Male) Deseret News Critic

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    It seems that it's been ages — nearly 10 years — since Steven Spilberg made a movie that could be categorized as "fun." After receiving his first taste of Oscar gold for 1993's "Schindler's List," the newer, more mature Spielberg has followed up that film primarily with more social-conscience epics — chief among them, 1997's "Amistad" and 1998's "Saving Private Ryan" (the latter having redefined the war movie and upped the ante for graphic movie violence). But somewhere along the way he also seems to have lost his sense of youthful exuberance, and while these films have been technically brilliant, they're not a real joy to watch. For 90 minutes, "Minority Report" appears to be the film that bucks that trend. Though it features the desaturated colors and darker tone that dominate later-period Spielberg (which makes it something of a companion piece to his flawed but fascinating "A.I. Artificial Intelligence"), this science-fiction picture is a kinetic thrill-ride. That is, until it collapses under the burden of big ideas and hole-ridden plotting. The result is somewhat satisfying — it still comes from Spielberg, who has never made anything that wasn't at least watchable. But it's also disappointing to a certain degree. (Also, the film seems to warrant a more severe rating than PG-13, considering how nasty some of the violence is, along with material in the final third.) Set in the future, "Minority Report" brings together Spielberg and Tom Cruise, who stars as Pre-Crime Det. John Anderton. Having lost his son, Anderton now does his best to prevent murders before they happen. Aiding him are three "pre-cogs," who have visions of future murders. Anderton and his team of detectives then lock up "suspects" before their crime actually occur. Consequently, Washington, D.C., is now murder-free. But the methods used are questionable, which is why the Justice Department sends in an FBI agent, Danny Witwer (Colin Farrell), to investigate the city's Pre-Crime Division. Witwer appears to be concentrating his efforts on Anderton, who suddenly becomes a murder "suspect" — and who finds himself on the run from his former colleagues. In its favor, the film does come close to matching the tone of the source material, a short story by cult favorite Philip K. Dick (whose works also inspired "Blade Runner" and "Total Recall"). And Spielberg and his effects team have come up with some dazzling action sequences, including a chase on a "vertical" highway that has to be seen to be believed. But the material is perhaps too ambitious for its own good. (The conclusion requires some sketchy plotting to close some pretty big holes in the story.) As Anderton, Cruise impresses in a demanding physical role, while Farrell and Max von Sydow are solid in supporting parts. "Minority Report" is rated PG-13 for violence (gunplay, stabbings and brutal hand-to-hand combat), occasional use of strong profanity (including one usage of the so-called R-rated curse word), simulated drug use (narcotics and anesthetics), gore, brief simulated sex and crude slang terms. Running time: 140 minutes. E-MAIL: jeff@desnews.com

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Okfor ages12+