La La Land La La Land

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La La Land

ages 14+ | 100 % Say It's Worth Your Time

A jazz pianist falls for an aspiring actress in Los Angeles.


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Genre: Comedy , Drama , Musical

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Ok for ages 14+ . What would you rate it? ?

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Rated PG-13 Rated PG-13 for some language

  • 0 of 10 Sex & Nudity
  • 0 of 10 Violence & Gore
  • 0 of 10 Profanity

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  • (Female)

    ages 12+ | Worth Your Time

    Grade: A Rating: PG-13, 128 minutes In a Nutshell: With a theme song that will be stuck in your head for a long time, this unexpected romantic musical feels like one of those magical movies Hollywood use to pump out decades ago. Beautifully shot in CinemaScope, it features the glamour, hope, sacrifice, pain, and dreams found in Los Angeles. It’s very entertaining and honest, already winning a Golden Globe for Best Motion Picture - Musical or Comedy, as well as a big trophy for both of its lead actors: Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling. Uplifting theme: “People love what other people are passionate about.” - Mia (Emma Stone) Here’s to the ones who dream… “You gotta give this everything you got.” - Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) Things I liked: Emma Stone’s face can show a thousand different expressions. She is so charming that you just can't keep your eyes off of her in every scene. It’s fun to hear some good jazz. Sebastian explains, "You can’t just hear it; you have to see it.” I know they must be partially or even completely manufactured, but I loved all the pretty LA sunsets. Ryan Gosling. Good on you. He can do it all. It even looks like he really played the keyboard. Ryan and Emma Stone have great chemistry. This is not their first movie together. I love the scene where they hold hands for the first time. I remember those breath-taking moves from dates gone by. It's really such a breath of fresh air. Keep those musicals coming. John Legend! Written and directed by Academy Award nominee Damien Chazelle. Nice job! I liked how the movie announced the seasons, reminding us how the seasons of our life come and go. This film reminded me of last year’s film Café Society that makes you ache with love, regret, and longing. Is this film a love letter to Los Angeles or Hollywood or being passionate about your dreams? Or maybe all three? The musical numbers easily blend into the traditional storytelling. The sequence at the end was done so well. I didn't expect to see J.K. Simmons in a musical! Things I didn’t like: I love Emma Stone, but I’m just wondering how much more fantastic this could have been with Anna Kendrick in the female lead role? Maybe match her up again with Justin Timberlake like when they were together in Trolls? Wow, can you imagine how great the soundtrack would have been? As it is, Emma and Ryan aren't what I would call "powerful" singers. If Director Chazelle was going for "sweet and simple", then he nailed it. That string of hair that constantly droops in Sebastian's face. The sound isn’t always quite in sync with the lips. It was funny, but also super annoying how Sebastian would honk loud and hard when he went to Mia's house and pick her up. Really? Be a gentleman and go to the door, Bud. It conjured up images of great dance numbers with Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, although not nearly as good. Interesting lines: “Why don’t you want to do it anymore?” – Sebastian “Because I think it hurts a little too much.” – Mia Funny lines: “This idea that we’re re-imagining Godilocks and the three bears from the perspective of the bears…it could be like a franchise. There’s a lot we don’t know. There could be 4 bears. We don’t know.” – Carlo (Jason Fuchs) “It’s pretty strange that we keep running into each other.” – Mia “It IS strange. Maybe it means something.” – Sebastian “I doubt it.” – Mia “Yeah, I don’t think so.” – Sebastian “You’re a real…um….what’s the word I’m looking for?” – Mia “Knight in shining armor.” – Sebastian “Weirdo…that was the word.” – Mia Tips for parents: This is pretty safe for all ages, but your daughters will probably enjoy it more than your sons. It’s a romantic musical after all. 1 F-bomb; otherwise, no other profanity. You see a couple living together out of wedlock. Plan on listening to your daughters sing these songs over and over again. @trinaboice

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  • (Male) Catholic News Service

    Mature 18+ | Worth Your Time

    Though it's set in present-day Los Angeles, the comedy-drama "La La Land" (Lionsgate) takes a spirited stab at reviving the musicals of Hollywood's golden age. Writer-director Damien Chazelle ("Whiplash") dreams big in this over-the-top fantasy where drivers exit their cars on a freeway overpass and burst into song, and lovers float in the air amid the projected stars in a planetarium. Beautifully shot in widescreen CinemaScope, "La La Land" is a unique and self-indulgent film, to say the least. But it tends to lose its way when song and dance take over. Fortunately, that's largely made up for by Chazelle's engaging script, a cast of first-rate actors, and superb jazz music.

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  • (Male) Plugged In

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    La La Land features just enough content to merit its PG-13 rating and to remind us that we're living in the 21st century. But apart from a handful of harsh profanities and a cohabitating couple, this song-filled, cynicism-free romance is about as old-fashioned as it gets these days. Mia (Emma Stone) and Sebastian (Ryan Gosling) sing and dance, laugh and cry, then sing and dance some more. Their romance, which is always in tension with their individual dreams, dazzles and delights. A happily-ever-after ending of sorts eventually emerges, but not before we're reminded of the potential relational costs of prioritizing our vocational dreams above all else. The story, while not particularly deep, doesn't rely on shock-and-awe special effects or shock-and-awe gross-out gags. Instead, director Damien Chazelle unleashes an old-school, tour de force musical, proving that that original, Oscar-worthy moviemaking—without R-rated gratuity—is actually still possible in Tinseltown.

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  • (Male) Crosswalk

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    What Works? La La Land is both a blast of nostalgia and wave of fresh newness, and that blend makes it a fascinating ride. Both leads are pining for a lost golden age (old Hollywood and old jazz, respectively) and the film mirrors this by hearkening to vintage musicals and films through its dance, music, vocal style, costumes and even plot elements. Gosling and Stone are captivating and funny - and easy on the ears when they sing. The simple through-line of their romance (courtship, love, conflict, resolution) feels true, is fun to watch, and really makes you think. Perhaps it goes without saying, coming from writer/director Damien Chazelle of Whiplash fame, but the jazz in the film is striking and the moments with Gosling at the piano are definite high points. What Doesn't? The film opens weak, growing stronger as it goes; some might even say it becomes a different animal entirely. The opening minutes weave characters in and out of song and dance like a proper musical, and those are by far the least compelling and even most uncomfortable moments in the film. This is due In part to inherent differences in live and filmed entertainment; many crucial elements of stage musicals don't translate well to film. But truthfully, much of it was due to Stone and Gosling lacking the technical finesse that made the singing-dancing greats of yesteryear so magical. Stone is a brilliant actress and has a lovely voice, but there's a reason directors used to cast Ginger Rogers when their films included tap dancing numbers.

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  • (Male) Deseret News Critic

    No Maturity Rating | Worth Your Time

    “La La Land” opens with an energetic, one-take musical number set on a crowded Los Angeles freeway, with singers and dancers leaping in and around bumper-to-bumper traffic in perfect choreographed harmony. It’s a dramatic entrance, but it’s actually a little deceptive. Spectacle may entertain us, but it’s story that truly moves us. Because as fun as that opening scene may be, the story that follows is what makes “La La Land” a great movie.

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  • (Female) Movie Mom

    ages 12+ | Worth Your Time

    There are tributes/references to classic films like “Singin’ in the Rain,” “Rebel Without a Cause,” and “The Umbrellas of Cherbourg,” but this movie is not derivative. The storyline is deceptively simple, but the specificity of the detail, depth of understanding, and beautiful performances create true movie magic. “La La Land” is narratively ambitious and emotionally resonant, with a final ten minutes that are pure, wistful poetry. Chazelle and Hurwitz understand that some feelings are just so big they have to be sung and danced. And this movie made me so happy I wanted to create a musical number of my own. But I settled for watching this more two more times instead.

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Okfor ages12+